Nauru minister calls for harmony between locals and visitors, says they are all ‘good’

Nauru minister calls for harmony between locals and visitors, says they are all ‘good’

The day after it was announced that the island would be returning to the Philippines, President Duterte called locals and visitors to “good” and even thanked the “mother country”.

But, in his first public comments since his election victory, Mr Duterte has shown that he still lacks the necessary political skills to bring the country back from the brin제천출장마사지강남 마사지k of international isolation.

He has called on the Philippines’ people to make the most of the good they can find in their new neighbor but even this doesn’t make up for the country’s history of oppression and human rights abuses, which are rarely mentioned on official visits.

‘Naglapo’

In the first of three public statements to the media last week, Mr Duterte said his desire to return the country is more important than the country’s history and culture.

“I am very serious about this [returning the country]. I also wish to tell you about these [my] principles as to what ‘Naglapo’ [the 개츠비 카지노locals, tourists and visitors must abide by] will be if the [Philippines] comes back,” he said, according to a translation by the country’s Department of Foreign Affairs on Wednesday.

“[I] hope that we will gain more respect and goodwill from the Philippine people if we return to [the Philippines].”

Image copyright @JornalNarendris Image caption Mr Duterte, right, is expected to deliver a speech at Ponce, the largest of eight government ministries in the island of Nauru

Mr Duterte said that the country was “good” and a country with “peace, order and friendship” and “good people”.

“I am very interested in this country, in its culture and history,” he said. “But the truth is that [the Philippines] has been taken from us for more than 100 years and i제천출장샵s now being forced to fight with us again against our will.

“I do not understand how our great nation has lost. My children ask me these questions each and every time we go to [Nauru].

“I believe that we can bring the Philippines back to what it was before the Japanese invasion; we just hope that we can do that in a proper way.”

He later referred to the country’s independence as “a myth” and said there were “no traces of that”.

“We, the Filipinos, have been colonised by the Japanese fro